Game Theory and Rationality

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1. News

Update December 9

All reading materials for the seminars are now available in the Documents section on Ping Pong. See you next week!

Update December 7

We have clarified the requirements for the contribution reports to be included in the project reports. Please download the updated project information for details.

We have updated the schedule for project presentations and seminars. There are no major changes, but the schedule could be tightened somewhat since some groups are empty. We have also switched rooms for a few groups in the project presentations on Monday. Please see the updated lecture plan for details. (Updated twice today!)

Please make sure you know your seminar deadlines: submit the reading guide no later than five days before your seminar. If your seminar is on a Monday, submit at latest the Wednesday before; if the seminar is on a Wednesday, submit at latest on the Friday before.

2. General course information

Documents

Other online resources:

3. Assignments, seminars, projects, etc

4. News archive

December 9

Reading guide and articles from group 12 now posted on Ping Pong.

December 8

Reading guides and articles for seminars by groups 7, 8, 10 are now posted on Ping Pong.

December 5

Preparation materials for seminars 3, 5, 6 are now available in the Documents section on Ping Pong.

We have agreed to make a slight rescheduling on Wednesday since group 4 will not host a seminar:

  • Seminar group 3: Wednesday 7 December 10.00-10.45
  • Seminar group 5: Wednesday 7 December 11.00-11.45
  • Seminar group 6: Wednesday 7 December 13.15-14.00

November 30

Preparation materials for the two first seminars (to be held on Monday 5 December) are now available in the Documents section on Ping Pong.

November 29

Slides from Vilhelm Verendel's guest lecture on collective action are now available in the Documents section on Ping Pong.

We are closing in on the student-led seminars. Please make sure you know your deadlines: submit the reading guide no later than five days before your seminar. If your seminar is on a Monday, submit at latest the Wednesday before; if the seminar is on a Wednesday, submit at latest on the Friday before.

November 24

The code for the prisoner's dilemma tournament (including all submitted strategies) is now posted in the Documents section on Ping Pong. You can run the simulations yourself or just open the Mathematica notebooks to look at precomputed results.

November 21

The guest lecture on Wednesday 23 November at 10.00 by Ove Granstrand on "Cooperative games – theory and experimental economics" will be based on Ch. 7 of the course book.

Materials for Erik Sterner's example seminar on Wednesday 23 November at 13.15 are now available on Ping Pong (under Documents/Seminars).

Some ideas for effective peer feedback are now posted under Section 3 below.

November 20

Short presentations of project ideas on Monday 21st is done in the two lecture halls FL41 and FL51.
In FL41 we have the groups A, B, E, F, I, J, K, L, and
in FL51 we have the groups C, D, G, H, M, N, O, P.
You give a <5 minute presentation of the project idea, allowing time for 5 min discussion; using words and white/black board is fine; if you want to use a slide (pdf, ppt, key) please email Kristian and Rasmus a copy in advance.

The Mathematica code for the two interactive Prisoner's Dilemma lattice models from the Wednesday lecture is available for download.

November 15

Assignment 3 is out. See instructions below.

Slides from Vilhelm Verendel's guest lecture on rationality can now be found in the Documents section on Ping Pong.

November 9

All the submitted game ideas are now posted under Documents/Game ideas on Ping Pong.

A Mathematica notebook with the evolutionary game shown in today's lecture is available under Documents/Lectures/9 November on Ping Pong.

Additional reading on evolutionary games can be found in the Documents section on Ping Pong under Recommended reading. Today's lectures built partly on Lindgren (1991) and Lindgren (1997).

November 8

The second assignment is out! Check under Section 3 below. Questions and answers at beginning of morning lecture on Wednesday.

November 4

Lectures 2-3 on Wednesday covered most of Chapters 1, 2 & 4 from the course book. At lecture 4 on Monday 7th, we will focus on repeated games (finite and infinite) and the Folk Theorem, i.e., Chapter 6. Recommended additional reading giving a broader picture of the basics of game theory and its applications, especially the work by Nash and Schelling, is the two papers by Roger Myerson. The papers are available in the Documents section on Ping Pong (under "Recommended reading/Introduction to game theoretic concepts").

The first assignment must be submitted before 18:00, Monday 7th. This is already announced in the "General course information…".

It is important that you read all information in the documents we have posted on this page (see below) since they describe in detail what is expected from you, including deadlines, forming groups for seminars and projects, etc.

 

November 3

The additional sessions for project preliminary results have been rescheduled. They are now all in the A block and we will run in parallel in two lecture rooms, on Monday, Dec. 12, 8:00-9:45, and on Wednesday, Dec. 14, 15:15-17:00. This is now also reflected in Time Edit and in the documents below. Slides and Mathematica code from the Introductory lecture are available in the Documents section on Ping Pong. We will continue putting slides there as we go along.

Kristian Lindgren

Kristian Lindgren is professor in complex systems. He has a background in engineering physics, but since his graduate studies in the 1980's he has been working with complex systems in a variety of different disciplines. Some main areas are (i) information theory for complex and self-organizing systems, (ii) game theory for evolutionary systems, and (iii) agent-based modeling of economic systems. Since the mid 1990's Lindgren has also been working in the area of energy systems with development of models of regional and global energy systems in a climate change perspective.

Lindgren is Director of the Graduate school (PhD) for Complex Systems at Chalmers, and he is teacher and examiner in the International Masters Programme in Complex Adaptive Systems.

 

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