These are teachers associated to the CAS program. The researchers are associated to a number of different research groups, working in a wide range of different disciplines, illustrating the breadth of the CAS program.

 

  • A fundamental question in the statistical physics of  complex systems is how spatial and temporal randomness may generate patterns and dynamics.

    The dynamics of complex systems can be systematically analysed using diffusion equations and random-matrix theory.  This approach may yield, as experience shows, surprisingly universal, and in several cases analytically exact results. More importantly, the results show that at first sight unrelated phenomena observed in complex systems in a wide range of different disciplines (Biology, Condensed Matter Physics, and Fluid Dynamics) can be understood in terms of simple and thus general mechanisms.

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  • My group is concerned with developing new ways of understanding societal systems from a complexity perspective. In this work we develop new models and theory and also work quite a bit on method development. At the moment we have two main application areas. The first is the evolution of cultures through the palaeolithic. Here we are interested in contributing to building a better understanding of how we came to be how we came to be (socially and biologically) – which is essential for putting our historical and modern societies in perspective. The second is an interest in what has been characterized as “sustainability transitions”: how we can bring about transitions in society – technological, economic, social and so on – to practices that do not undermine their own existence by their very operation. But this is a highly challenging task. Compared with “naturally occurring” transitions, sustainability transitions are economically and politically “uphill reactions”. Their benefits are diffuse, hard to quantify and reside in the future. Often their benefits are even negatively defined: they consist in averting some disaster that we have not and should not produce an example of. Their costs on the other hand are focal, immediate and highly quantifiable. The third is urban morphology and dynamics from a perspective of complex systems and spatial interaction via models of accessibility.

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  • Erik Edlund is a PhD-student in the Complex Systems group since 2010 and works mainly on developing theory for self-assembling systems. This field aims for a fundamental shift in materials science and fabrication by moving the focus from top-down techniques to a method where constituents are designed such that they spontaneously form desired structures. The group uses a combination of analytically solvable models from statistical physics and Monte Carlo simulations. Erik lectures in the course Simulation of Complex Systems.

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  • Erik Sterner is since 2011 working with climate change using simple climate models. In more detail he focuses on the effects of short lived climate forcers, like Black Carbon, on the climate system and compares them to the effects of carbon dioxide. The aim of his research is to contribute to the understanding of the climate change abatement strategies that the short lived climate forcers offer. Erik has always been interested in pedagogics. Originally the interest was bound to a “maths-mentorship” called Intize but has during his PhD-studies switched into development of courses etc.

    Position: PhD candidate, Creator of studycas.com

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  • Kolbjörn's research focuses on swarm behavior. 

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  • Senior lecturer

    Krister Wolff is doing research within bio-inspired computational methods for optimization in connection with autonomous robots and intelligent vehicle technologies, e.g. development of active safety systems for vehicles and driver modeling.

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  • Kristian Lindgren is professor in complex systems. He has a background in engineering physics, but since his graduate studies in the 1980's he has been working with complex systems in a variety of different disciplines. Some main areas are (i) information theory for complex and self-organizing systems, (ii) game theory for evolutionary systems, and (iii) agent-based modeling of economic systems. Since the mid 1990's Lindgren has also been working in the area of energy systems with development of models of regional and global energy systems in a climate change perspective.

    Lindgren is Director of the Graduate school (PhD) for Complex Systems at Chalmers, and he is teacher and examiner in the International Masters Programme in Complex Adaptive Systems.

     

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  • Position: PhD Candidate

  • Martin Nilsson Jacobi is professor of complex systems at Chalmers. He has a background in theoretical physics but during his PhD studies he switched research direction into the interdisciplinary field of complex systems. His resent research has mainly been focused on hierarchical organization in dynamical systems, coarse graining in many particle systems, and prediction, design and control of self-organizing systems. Professor Nilsson Jacobi is also acting as head of the Physical Resource Theory division, an organization consisting of ca 35 researchers (including PhD students).

    Position: Professor

  • Director of the CAS master program and node leader of the Erasmus Mundus master in complex systems. 

    Mats research is primarily on correlated electron systems which is complex systems in a quantum setting. He also has an interest in complex systems proper and has supervised projects in econophysics, taught mathematical biology, and is currently working on the Minority Game.  

    Position: Associate Professor

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  • Professor Mattias Wahde is researcher and teacher within the research group Adaptive Systems.The ultimate aim of his research is to generate autonomous robots capable of carrying out a variety of relevant tasks, particularly dangerous or tedious tasks which are presently carried out by people. His research is focused on generating robotic brains (control systems) rather than hardware (robots). In particular, he is developing a method (the utility function method) for behavioral selection. This method, as well as his research in general, is based on biologically inspired computation methods, particularly evolutionary algorithms (EAs).

    Position: Professor

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  • Ola Benderius is a PhD student at the Division of Vehicle Engineering and Autonomous Systems.

    Ola Benderius works in a project which is about development of models for driver behavior in emergency situations. Olas purpose of this project is to better understand driver behavior in situations when active safety systems intervene and take over control of the vehicle.

    Position: PhD Student (supervisor: Mattias Wahde)

     

  • Oskar Lindgren is a PhD-student in the Complex Systems group and works mainly on developing theory for self-assembling systems. This field aims for a fundamental shift in materials science and fabrication by moving the focus from top-down techniques to a method where constituents are designed such that they spontaneously form desired structures. The group uses a combination of analytically solvable models from statistical physics and Monte Carlo simulations.

    Position: PhD Student (supervisor: Martin Nilsson Jacobi)

  • Since May 2012, Petter works as a PhD-student within the complex systems group at Physical Resource Theory. His work focuses on applying a complexity perspective to analyze the social implications of the innovation processes of our society, attempting to find ways to improve these processes to reduce their negative social and environmental externalities. This research question includes multiple more specific research topics, such as using automobility as an illustrating example.

    Position: PhD candidate (supervisor: Claes Andersson), Creator of studycas.com

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  • Rasmus is a PhD student at Physical Resource Theory.

  • Stellan Östlunds primary research interests are correlated electronic systems, superconductivity in low dimensional systems and chaos.

    Position: Professor

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  • Vilhelm Verendel is a PhD student in the Complex Systems group. In his research he applies methods from complex systems to model cooperation in social systems. He has so far worked with modeling of rational agents in repeated strategic interactions and with empirical methods for "big data". Applications include agent-based models of land use and in understanding the economics of climate change using network theory.